How Oliver Wyman Helped Expand Cancer Care Excellence

In this video, the executive and clinical team at Leaders in Oncology Care and HCA describe how Oliver Wyman helped them revolutionize the way they deliver cancer care. The two organizations had very different cultures, but with the Oliver Wyman team’s help, they focused on the areas where each excelled and unearthed new opportunities to grow while never losing sight of quality and the patient experience. Now, armed with powerful care models and dashboards, they are producing exceptional cancer care through the U.K and aiming their sights on the U.S. market.

CANCER AND HEALTHCARE REFORM: MAKING THE PIECES FIT

The public tends to think of healthcare reform as being primarily about healthcare coverage for the uninsured. Certainly, that is one of its most important features, and it will likely bring about striking changes in the broad healthcare marketplace. Based on an "intent to buy" survey we conducted, we expect roughly 39 million of those currently uninsured to enter the market in the next few years, bringing with them $150 billion in annual buying power. But there has always been more to reform than signing up the uninsured. The economic forces set in motion as these consumers buy coverage will lead to a dramatic transformation in how care is delivered, therapeutic area by therapeutic area. The hope is that competition and the new business models enabled by the Affordable Care Act will tame the relentless medical inflation that has marked the past two decades and will make healthcare affordable for Americans.

The Opportunity

The public tends to think of healthcare reform as being primarily about healthcare coverage for the uninsured. Certainly, that is one of its most important features, and it will likely bring about striking changes in the broad healthcare marketplace. Based on an "intent to buy" survey we conducted, we expect roughly 39 million of those currently uninsured to enter the market in the next few years, bringing with them $150 billion in annual buying power. But there has always been more to reform than signing up the uninsured. The economic forces set in motion as these consumers buy coverage will lead to a dramatic transformation in how care is delivered, therapeutic area by therapeutic area. The hope is that competition and the new business models enabled by the Affordable Care Act will tame the relentless medical inflation that has marked the past two decades and will make healthcare affordable for Americans.

Few segments of medicine will be more affected by healthcare reform than oncology. The cancer marketplace is ripe for change, the sort of change that leads to better care for patients, lower costs, and—for provider organizations capable of reinventing themselves—greater profitability. The aging of the American population and advances in treatments are expanding the market. Leading oncologists have recognized that a major opportunity is emerging to change the value formula at a time when payers and consumers alike are looking for more value. In fact, a few leading cancer service organizations have figured out how to increase the value of cancer services (measured in terms of improved outcomes and greater patient satisfaction), while decreasing the cost by 20 percentage points.

When viewed through the lens of healthcare value and affordability, cancer is a high-opportunity market—but to take advantage of the opportunity, fundamental change is required.

How Oliver Wyman Helped Expand Cancer Care Excellence

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